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Windows Embedded Compact 7
10-12-2013, 11:02 PM
Post: #1
Windows Embedded Compact 7
Will this stack run on a Windows Embedded Compact 7 environment (WEC7)?
If so, has anyone had success in creating a project for this environment?

Thanks,
Aaron.
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11-12-2013, 09:21 AM
Post: #2
RE: Windows Embedded Compact 7
(10-12-2013 11:02 PM)AaronNielsen Wrote:  Will this stack run on a Windows Embedded Compact 7 environment (WEC7)?
If so, has anyone had success in creating a project for this environment?

We haven't tried this but, based on a quick look at its capabilities, I can't see why ohNet wouldn't work here.

You should be able to test this out by building from the command line. Launch the appropriate Visual Studio Command Prompt, cd to the directory with ohNet source and run make.

I'd expect things will just work from here. We'll be happy to help if it turns out that some changes are required. Let us know how you get on.
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13-12-2013, 09:19 PM
Post: #3
RE: Windows Embedded Compact 7
I am not too familiar with using a .mak file but there has to be more to it than just running the existing mak files. Those are not setup to target the correct OS no do they include the needed SDK.

Also I am quite confused by the code layout for the source code. There are quite a few files with the same name in different folders so I am not quite sure where to start.

What would really help is if there was an existing Visual Studio project for a C++ build targeting windows, or someone could tell which file to include in such a project.

Thanks,
Aaron
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16-12-2013, 10:13 AM
Post: #4
RE: Windows Embedded Compact 7
(13-12-2013 09:19 PM)AaronNielsen Wrote:  I am not too familiar with using a .mak file but there has to be more to it than just running the existing mak files. Those are not setup to target the correct OS no do they include the needed SDK.

Did you try building from a Visual Studio Command Prompt? This sets up environment variables necessary to select the appropriate SDK, (cross-)compiler etc.

If this is not sufficient to get a build working, you could try looking at a sample project that comes with your SDK and comparing the compiler flags it sets with the ones set by OhNet.mak.


(13-12-2013 09:19 PM)AaronNielsen Wrote:  Also I am quite confused by the code layout for the source code. There are quite a few files with the same name in different folders so I am not quite sure where to start.

Can you give us some examples of the areas you find confusing? The only area of duplication I can think of is under the Os directory. The rules for file inclusion here are pretty straightforward:
  • Windows builds use source under the Windows directory
  • Linux/Mac builds use source under the Posix directory
  • Other OSes need to implement the functions defined in Os.h
You are building for Windows so will use the source under the Windows directory. Source under the Posix directory will be ignored by your builds.

(13-12-2013 09:19 PM)AaronNielsen Wrote:  What would really help is if there was an existing Visual Studio project for a C++ build targeting windows, or someone could tell which file to include in such a project.

It would be possible for you to create a VS solution. This will be a fair bit of work and will require you to learn more about makefiles so I advise against it. It is much easier to just build from the command line.

If you really want to try this, the objects_core variable near the top of Common.mak lists the source files included in the core library. Searching for these object names in Common.mak will give you their paths.
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